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Why_Johnny_Hates_Sports

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Reply with quote  #1 
http://time.com/money/4037391/soccer-bills-college-family-budget/?xid=homepage


To some of you guys from the other side of the pond ( Great Britain) , how much does an average family spend on their child to play soccer/futbol/fussball for the entire year? 
MrSoccer

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Reply with quote  #2 
How did they do in those 6 tournaments?

No corporate sponsors?

If they are not winning those tournaments it is a waste of money to go.

For any tournament we entered we train 2 months preparing for them.

How good are those kids?

Would love to see them play.

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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #3 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Why_Johnny_Hates_Sports
http://time.com/money/4037391/soccer-bills-college-family-budget/?xid=homepage


To some of you guys from the other side of the pond ( Great Britain) , how much does an average family spend on their child to play soccer/futbol/fussball for the entire year? 

Depends on the Club/Area/Age.
The travel costs may not be as high as in the US, but cash cow syndrome is way in advance.
The Premiership clubs have perfected the marketing art of fleecing parents from all sides.

For the amatuer clubs there is a wide gulf of differing fees for parents to allow their kids to play organised soccer.
Then there are the endless tournaments, the insulting cost of newer and newer brands of boots (cleats), team strips, coaching fees and so on...

This is from March last year...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/26766742

 


 

Goal150

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev

This is from March last year...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/26766742



Seems to be the conundrum of governance these days... voters want everything, just not to pay for it. 


Goal150

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It's kinda sad to me that they've put themselves in this situation. A big chunk of America lives like this and it's not just because of soccer or any sport. It's basically that we don't have a culture of savings. In 2008, when the economy crashed, it was well documented that leading up to it nearly all American families had a negative savings rate. 

No matter how much one makes, there is a tendency to increase spending to match any increase in income. 
Snicky

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Reply with quote  #6 
I think it is the American way, if you don't spend it on soccer you spend it on another sport or activity.  The cost is driven by supply and demand, if no one did it, the cost would fall.  Also, a lot of parents in the States are driven by the thought of a scholarship.  

I would say the cost to play on a decent travel team in the States (challenge for State Cup and regional tournaments is north of $5000 per year (speaking from personal experience), It can get near $10,000 if you play national league and make national finals (this includes flights, hotels, other travel, etc) - most US travel, the parents go as well.  

When speaking to people in England, they said they paid around 600 bucks for a year.  That included a tournament in Holland.

Kev - you say the prem clubs fleece players ?  I assume that is in the general public at large (camps, schools, etc) and academy football is all paid for ? 

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newsocdad

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In our experience most of the cost is in the travel.  Club fees in my area will range from about $500 to $2000 depending on the club, location, level of play, and number/location of winter practices (cold weather state). 

The family in the article has drunk the Kool-Aid, but hey -- so did we.  In a couple of years they will learn that they do not have to go to random tournaments to get exposure to college coaches. 
Snicky

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Reply with quote  #8 
Yes, flying and hotels eat the money up, that is the issue with the size of the US.  

Parents in the States also buy into Gotsoccer rankings, so the more tournaments you play (assuming you do well) the more points you get.  "Hey, we are number 1 in the State !!"

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Enganche

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Reply with quote  #9 
I charge my players $300 for year-round playing, and I pocket $0. That includes spring and fall league, winter league and training and summer street ball and training... all I have is a clear framework, disks and balls and a crappy field to use... i feel bad for these kids
Firemaker

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newsocdad
In our experience most of the cost is in the travel.  Club fees in my area will range from about $500 to $2000 depending on the club, location, level of play, and number/location of winter practices (cold weather state). 

The family in the article has drunk the Kool-Aid, but hey -- so did we.  In a couple of years they will learn that they do not have to go to random tournaments to get exposure to college coaches. 


Shame? Maybe a little on the clubs? For not educating these parents about having more realistic expectations on where and when their kids can be scouted. 
coachkev

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snicky
I think it is the American way, if you don't spend it on soccer you spend it on another sport or activity.  The cost is driven by supply and demand, if no one did it, the cost would fall.  Also, a lot of parents in the States are driven by the thought of a scholarship.  

I would say the cost to play on a decent travel team in the States (challenge for State Cup and regional tournaments is north of $5000 per year (speaking from personal experience), It can get near $10,000 if you play national league and make national finals (this includes flights, hotels, other travel, etc) - most US travel, the parents go as well.  

When speaking to people in England, they said they paid around 600 bucks for a year.  That included a tournament in Holland.

Kev - you say the prem clubs fleece players ?  I assume that is in the general public at large (camps, schools, etc) and academy football is all paid for ? 


The pro clubs academies are funded by the clubs.
However, the satellite academies, schools of excellence etc are poorly funded and so if your child is selected for, lets say, the Elite group, then the costs spiral for the parents.
Maddog

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Reply with quote  #12 
newsocdad:  You drank the Kool-Aid I'm shocked [biggrin] Glad to see you admit it that shows you understand some of my complaints with  US Soccer.
ParentCoach

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Reply with quote  #13 
My family got off the train as my daughter entered HS...she continued to play, but we clearly understood we weren't playing for college money.

I think the point being missed by many US posters, though, is that if you are sending kids to college in the US, the colleges will find a way to eat every penny you have.  So, if you have less -- because you spent it in enjoyable ways -- the colleges take a smaller amount from you than if you saved for college.  Either way, the colleges take it all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goal150


It's kinda sad to me that they've put themselves in this situation. A big chunk of America lives like this and it's not just because of soccer or any sport. It's basically that we don't have a culture of savings. In 2008, when the economy crashed, it was well documented that leading up to it nearly all American families had a negative savings rate. 

No matter how much one makes, there is a tendency to increase spending to match any increase in income. 
newsocdad

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Reply with quote  #14 
newsocdad:  You drank the Kool-Aid I'm shocked [biggrin] Glad to see you admit it that shows you understand some of my complaints with  US Soccer.

We were no different than a great many parents with kids that have some particular talent which allows them to excel in one or more activities - sports, music, art, whatever.   We learn as we go.

We took a hard look really after my daughter's u14 year - as our daughter was headed into high school.  Recruiting was just getting started, and she had played for a very good team made up of kids from all over the state really.  They played lots of tournaments, etc. . ., but there were also quite a few major injuries.  I recall that about a third of the team had some sort of major injury that kept them out for extended periods of time.  At the end of her u14 year I sat down and added up the number of games the girls had played.  I included only games played with a referee - so no practice scrimmages, and I recall the number as being 92.  It was in the 90s for sure.  

She did not tryout for that team again.  Maybe a mistake, but she is still playing - now for her college team.  What we found was college coaches were still happy to look at her (and her teammates) even if they were only playing on a regional level team.  Oddly, the coaches were more interested in what the individual players could do, and not so much in what a team was doing.

An example that we were talking about just last week - That team played an out-of-state tournament which they ultimately won, but that meant playing 5 games in 3 days (Friday night - 2 on Saturday and 2 on Sunday).  In the final they played the 2nd half with 9 players as that was all that were healthy enough to be on the field, and that included a girl who played keeper with a severe ankle sprain, because the team's keeper had gotten knocked out earlier in the game.  Just nuts of course, but the Kool-Aid still tasted okay at that point.       


     
BobC

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Reply with quote  #15 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newsocdad
At the end of her u14 year I sat down and added up the number of games the girls had played.  I included only games played with a referee - so no practice scrimmages, and I recall the number as being 92.  It was in the 90s for sure.  



Are you serious? 92 in ONE year? [eek]

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newsocdad

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Reply with quote  #16 
That team was not the only one playing that kind of schedule in our area.  The local superclubs probably played more games, and there was a very, very good u13 team that kept that kind of schedule too as they often played up and used the same winter facility.  And, of course, the kids practiced at least twice a week. 

It was obviously too much soccer even for kids who loved playing, and it was way to fraught with potential for injury.  Our kid (and us) lucked out and had no major injuries.  Just the usual bumps and bruises which caused her to miss a couple of games.  I recall a couple girls had severe concussions that kept them out for extended periods (and this was before everyone was so serious about concussions), there were 2 knee surgeries, and at least 2 broken bones.

This was a team though that was being set up to try and win a usysa national championship (no ecnl back then).  Kids did come from all over to play on it, and the training was very good.  But -- way, way too much soccer and travel.  The girls were good students thankfully, and lots of homework as done in the car. 

Socially, it was probably better for the parents than the kids.  I recall it was mostly a nice group of parents and we were all in the same boat.  For the girls though it was like they were little professionals.  They mostly lived too far away from each other to really socialize off the field, and very few went to school together.  Down time at tournaments was mostly spent working on homework with maybe a movie in the evening.     

As for the game total:  It has been too long, but just guesstimating I would say the game breakdown was something like this:

3 pre-season tournaments (I think one was out of state).  They usually won or made the finals of every tournament so say:  4 games each for a total of 12 games.  League games 10.  State Cup 6.  Some US Soccer champion league which was newly formed and had only a few teams - maybe 6 games there.  Winter leagues - 3 indoor sessions (full field) with about 8 games each.  (58 total so far).  Two warm weather tournaments (Disney and somewhere else in FLA - 8 games)  (running total up to 66).  A March tournament - St. Louis - cold as all get out (5).  League play 10 (81)  Out-of-state tournament in (4), Local Tournament for Memorial Day (4) and then some round-robin "early college showcase" with the local top teams (3)  I think that makes 93, but I could be off.  That team would regularly scrimmage a decent local u13 boys team in order to work on speed of play, but the coaches referred those games.  It could have been worse.  The team did not win state cup  so no regional play that year.    

By the end of that year the Kool-Aid was not as sweet.  My wife and I, as well as several other parents of kids on that team, took a look at $$$ and time and said -- maybe our kid does not have to be on a team looking to try and win a national championship.  I would say though that most of the kids on the team are playing in college now.    



                         
Azzurri

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Reply with quote  #17 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newsocdad
...I would say though that most of the kids on the team are playing in college now. 


...and they would have all ended in the same place had they foregone all the non-local games and/or played 1/3 as many games...at U13...
benji

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Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newsocdad
the coaches were more interested in what the individual players could do, and not so much in what a team was doing.


This.

I SOOO wish that more parents understood this. While it certainly is beneficial to be on a top team, it is not a requirement.

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MisterLogic

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Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by benji
Quote:
Originally Posted by newsocdad
the coaches were more interested in what the individual players could do, and not so much in what a team was doing.


This.

I SOOO wish that more parents understood this. While it certainly is beneficial to be on a top team, it is not a requirement.


I don't understand how that isn't self evident.
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