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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #1 

Although as coaches, we try and give specialist goalkeeper training to the teams GK/GKs, it can sometimes be counter productive in terms of synergising the GK with the team, especially the defenders, and also as a general social and psychological 'linking up'

The main problem is that for most coaches, their experience of running drills/functions/ssg's that include the goalkeeper is limited.
The GK should never be used as 'shot stoppers' to hone strikers shooting skills.

What I have found beneficial is to separate the back 4 and GK pre-match and go through a simple passing drill, before the GK does more specific goalkeeping work. It has certainly improved the defensive cohesion in the ensuing match, especially when the GK collects the ball from a misplaced pass or just collecting the ball. The GK has expressed that he has more faith in his defence, and in turn the defenders are working that much harder to support him.

The little drill is:

start positions:
                                         coach
                                            o

LB                                                                            RB

                       LCB                           RCB


                                          GK    
................................|                  |..............................

The coach plays to the GK who collects it.
AS the ball moves, BOTH L&R backs back pedal to go flat with the ball...

                         LCB                           RCB

LB                                         o                                   RB
                                          GK    
.................................|                  |..............................

The reason is that both the backs can now see play in front whereas the 2 centre backs will have their backs to play.
The GK now rolls to the left or right back.
AS the ball is moving to the back, the centre back NEAREST to the receiver back pedals to provide an angle of support in case the receiving back is pressured....

i.e. Ball rolled to the right back
                                                

LB                           LCB                                             o
                                                                                RB
                                                            RCB
                                        GK    
...............................|                  |..............................


... the other centre back gets level with the ball while the opposite back (the LB here) also gets level with the ball.

Now, the receiving back passes to the nearest CB, who plays to the other CB who plays to the opposite back (in this case it would be the LB.
The LB would now pass to the coach who passes again to the GK who repeats the process the opposite way by rolling to the LB and all reposition etc.

This is repeated for about 5 minutes, and then an option is introduced where the coach states that at ANY point in the sequence, they will yell "PRESS" and the receiving player must play back to the GK who kicks the ball first time to the coach (yes I know the coach is central but this is just rehearsing the point)

After another 2 minutes, the defenders rejoin the main team while the GK continues their specific goalkeeping warm up.


What other ways do you integrate goalkeepers within team drills (apart from technical warm ups)????

thecoach17

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Reply with quote  #2 
I am a GK coach by trade so I've done a lot of the 'Integrating the GK" sessions with the coaching staff at my club for when I'm not at their sessions.  Here are a few regular drills that include a GK...

1. Variation on soccer tennis type SSG (complete X passes and then pass to the other side for a point) add goals where the players get a bonus point for scoring on the GK to play it to the other side (if you only have one GK put one goal in the centre of the grid):

Integrating the GK.jpg 
1b.  Variation:  Put endzones at the back of each side...to get a put you must play a long ball to the GK for a point...GK must cleanly play the ball (with feet or hands) for the point to count.  GK then distributes to other team with an under hand bowl.

Integrating the GK 2.jpg 

2. During pre-match warm ups when the team is passing and moving freely in space, I will include the GK in the action from his goal (similar to how kev described his drill with the backs).  field players can chip the ball into the GK's hands (followed by hand distribution of some kind) or play the ball along the floor for a pass back simulation.  This helps remind the field players they can use the GK to pass to.

3. During a passing and movement exercise like the prematch warm up the GK's can intercept any pass (diving save, parry, etc).  Variation 2:  Spit to 2 teams...to get a point your Xth pass must be caught in the air by the GK(s) who are neutral.

Really any drill can incorporate the GK...rather than playing the ball with their feet/chest, etc they play it with their hands and distribute accordingly.


Azzurri

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev

"...

The main problem is that for most coaches, their experience of running drills/functions/ssg's that include the goalkeeper is limited.
The GK should never be used as 'shot stoppers' to hone strikers shooting skills.

..."



For brevity, I kept just the above part of your post.

My approach is simple.  We have no (as in zero) specialized GK training.  For the duration of our training sessions, our GK partakes in every activity that the field players perform.  Thus, he is one of them, and not an "outsider".  The only exception is, when there IS an activity that requires a GK, he (naturally) fills that role, or when a neutral might be in order for a particular activity, he is usually a logical candidate.

As for your statement that "The GK should never...", I have to ask...come again?  What is wrong with that?  It's a win-win, if you ask me.  Unless you mean exclusively in that capacity (but then you would not have qualified your statement with "never").  A GK is primarily a shot-blocker, and what better way to train for that than by...facing shots.  And what better way to simulate realistic shooting situations than...taking shots on a live GK.  Not sure what the problem is...

[For some context, my older team---where this approach has been practiced for seven-plus years---is now high-level U17, and competitive with any club team on the east coast, so we're not talking about it working at (just) a recreational level.]

PS: We also do not do any specialized attacking or defending sessions or activities where only the players who most often (or exclusively) play positions commonly associated with those roles participate in the respective activity.  In our system, everybody participates fully and equally in ALL activities.  In other words, other than for the GK as noted on a limited basis above, specialization only exists (somewhat, owing to relative positioning) on game day.
coachkev

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azzurri
Quote:
Originally Posted by coachkev

"...

The main problem is that for most coaches, their experience of running drills/functions/ssg's that include the goalkeeper is limited.
The GK should never be used as 'shot stoppers' to hone strikers shooting skills.

..."



For brevity, I kept just the above part of your post.

My approach is simple.  We have no (as in zero) specialized GK training.  For the duration of our training sessions, our GK partakes in every activity that the field players perform.  Thus, he is one of them, and not an "outsider".  The only exception is, when there IS an activity that requires a GK, he (naturally) fills that role, or when a neutral might be in order for a particular activity, he is usually a logical candidate.


As for your statement that "The GK should never...", I have to ask...come again?  What is wrong with that?  It's a win-win, if you ask me.  Unless you mean exclusively in that capacity (but then you would not have qualified your statement with "never").  A GK is primarily a shot-blocker, and what better way to train for that than by...facing shots.  And what better way to simulate realistic shooting situations than...taking shots on a live GK.  Not sure what the problem is...

[For some context, my older team---where this approach has been practiced for seven-plus years---is now high-level U17, and competitive with any club team on the east coast, so we're not talking about it working at (just) a recreational level.]

PS: We also do not do any specialized attacking or defending sessions or activities where only the players who most often (or exclusively) play positions commonly associated with those roles participate in the respective activity.  In our system, everybody participates fully and equally in ALL activities.  In other words, other than for the GK as noted on a limited basis above, specialization only exists (somewhat, owing to relative positioning) on game day.

And your reply in the first paragraph explains your question to the word "never"
Obviously you havent had seasons of specialist GK training in your sessions otherwise you would not be stating what you posted.
The GK is in one of the most dangerous positions in play and without coaching the specifics of keeping themselves safe when collecting/diving for shots/diving at feet/jumping to catch high balls then you are abdicating your responsibility for the welfare of EVERY player you coach.

Quote:"...My approach is simple.  We have no (as in zero) specialized GK training".

You say that like its a badge of honor - wow. You expect your GK to be safe and dive at the feet of opponents WITHOUT teaching them HOW to be safe etc. I'm sure the GKs parents will thank you for that?

A GK should NEVER (yes there I go again) never be primarily used as a shot stopper.
A GK is PRIMARILY the insurance should the players in front of them not be able to prevent a strike.
Having fun where the GK dives like a lunatic while the players hit shot after shot before serious training begins is one thing, but deliberately running drills that ONLY include the GK as something to aim shots at is naive to say the least....and plain wrong.

This is like putting a 10 year old into an empty swimming pool and then showing them how to swim and then expect them to do it properly when the pool is filled with water.
If every coach followed YOUR logic then ALL the players would take turns in goal and it wouldnt matter a bit because they are all doing the same thing anyway.............

Could I ask if you were a player or GK when you played????
I ask because your reply is typical of what I hear from even experienced coaches who were players when they played.
Coaches who have had some experience as a GK have a completely different approach to the unique position of the GK.
We call this type of coaching 'Ad Lib' and its like a comedian who goes off script....while its working everyone laughs until it all goes wrong and then....

quote: "...[For some context, my older team---where this approach has been practiced for seven-plus years---is now high-level U17, and competitive with any club team on the east coast, so we're not talking about it working at (just) a recreational level.]

You must have an incredible liability insurance cover if that is truly what you have run over the years.
In the EPL, NO club would be able to get away with a development program operating like that or if they DID then it would cost the earth to have.

qoute.."...PS: We also do not do any specialized attacking or defending sessions or activities where only the players who most often (or exclusively) play positions commonly associated with those roles participate in the respective activity.  In our system, everybody participates fully and equally in ALL activities.  In other words, other than for the GK as noted on a limited basis above, specialization only exists (somewhat, owing to relative positioning) on game day"

Remember, I posted the thread about using GKs in a more positive way as a coach.
Obviously you havent any special ways to intergrate GKs other than to let players shoot and shoot against them so fair enough, thats your viewpoint.

BobC

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Reply with quote  #5 

Well this is opening up a fairly good discussion; the value of "position-less" training and how it can translate into a "position-less" style of play.

I could go on quite a bit about this, but let me just say for now:

I have adopted much of what you are saying about "everybody participates fully and equally in ALL activities". I train players to be complete all-around players and now all of the basic aspects of the game. "Be a complete player, play the complete game" is my mantra.  However, I believe that this approach can be taken to an extreme at the detriment of players' long-term development.

While it's true that there are principles of play that apply across the pitch and should be learned & mastered by all players, that doesn't change the fact that there are still roles, and with those roles come certain areas of emphasis and responsibility. For instance, I want my central backs to stay central and work together as a unit, and to make sure they are keeping the middle of the field protected. Outside forward or wingers have freedom to make diagonal runs, overlap & interchange with other players, send in crosses, etc. Attacking mids need to take on a play-making/distributing emphasis, and help control the tempo/pace of play, etc.

All should know how to move in support of the teammate with the ball, to use first touch to set up the next pass or buy time, to apply pressure/cover when defending, etc. All players should know those basics, but not all will have the same role during match play (as described above), they have differing areas of emphasis depending on the role they are assigned at the time. At some point time needs to be taken to teach & train those things, and this applies perhaps more to goalkeepers than anyone else.

So my question to you Azzurri, is if they are all doing the same generic activities and never do any training relative to the specific roles, who is going to teach them those things? Are you expecting that they just figure that out on their own?

Great that you have had success with your method, but most coaches would find it more effective to use the approach I explained above.


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Azzurri

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Reply with quote  #6 
BobC...I appreciate your thoughtful response.

Actually, I do not disagree with anything you said, and quite frankly pretty much share the same philosophy.

What I am saying by eschewing "specialized" training is that I do not separate the front-line players and backs in practice and have the former work on certain activities while the latter do more "defensive drills", and not have any interchange.  Nor do I have a night of the week called "striker session" or "finishing clinic" that is attended by those in attacking roles.

Instead, all my training sessions are equal participation, and all are an integral part of the year-long (dare I say, career-long) curriculum to develop complete soccer players.  So, if the theme of my session on Wednesday night is through balls (or finishing for that matter) in the attacking third, all I am saying is that we run the drills so that everyone will participate and cycle through the various starting positions (i.e., A goes to B, B to C, C to D, etc).  So everyone gets equal iterations at the back/mf role, the striker role, the 2nd attacker role, the defending role(s), etc.  Initially, as the session inevitably progresses in terms of complexity, pressure, etc, the GK is also one of the player that cycles through.  Only towards the end, when we incorporate a finishing element, does he then assume the role of GK (and, as possible, he will even get opps to finish on a GK as we have a back-up GK).

And when we do things like PCB, the forwards and attacking mids play each of those roles as well, even when the drill is specific to the defending third.

So, yes, we absolutely do role-specific training as part of our re-curring practice sessions, and don't rely on players to just figure it out all on their own.  The underlying idea is to develop complete soccer players.  (A) they will not always play with me, and (B) on another team and/or at a future time they may not always play the position they primarily play with our team and (C), I emphatically encourage players to play something akin to total football, especially with the backs moving up and making runs whenever it is there.

Kev...I'll respond to your reply as soon as i get a chance.
BobC

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Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Azzurri

Kev...I'll respond to your reply as soon as i get a chance.


Just remember to use lots of CAPS [wink]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Azzurri

Instead, all my training sessions are equal participation, and all are an integral part of the year-long (dare I say, career-long) curriculum to develop complete soccer players.  So, if the theme of my session on Wednesday night is through balls (or finishing for that matter) in the attacking third, all I am saying is that we run the drills so that everyone will participate and cycle through the various starting positions (i.e., A goes to B, B to C, C to D, etc).  So everyone gets equal iterations at the back/mf role, the striker role, the 2nd attacker role, the defending role(s), etc.  Initially, as the session inevitably progresses in terms of complexity, pressure, etc, the GK is also one of the player that cycles through.  Only towards the end, when we incorporate a finishing element, does he then assume the role of GK (and, as possible, he will even get opps to finish on a GK as we have a back-up GK).


Yes, I would say are methods are very close then. Maybe the only slight difference is this part:

"So everyone gets equal iterations at the back/mf role, the striker role, the 2nd attacker role, the defending role"

There are times when I do this, and part of it is because I do not have permanently assigned positions throughout the year, so on a given day a player might be on the back line, and the next time play striker. So across the team they need to learn the important concepts of play.

But at some point I think there is a time & place for specific players to have extended time learning specific roles. I have girls that I know I'm going to look to start on the back line; it may be 5 or 6 total, but I know who they are, and unless most of them are gone on match day I'm not going to pick any of the others to play in the back. So if we are doing a session on building from the back, starting with keeper distribution, I am going to have those girls who I know will be playing in the back play in the back. I may interchange a couple during the session, but it will still be from that group of 5-6 players.

Or, we may do a session on combination play/penetration in the attacking third. Same thing, certain players may get asked to play the attacking mid & forward roles, others not likely. And the likely backs will be on the back line for that activity so they know how to defend it.

I believe they appreciate having the training time to get good at these things, and while the rest may not ever be asked to play in the role being emphasized (that year anyway), they can still watch & learn as the coaching points are made. Everybody benefits, but the role-specific training helps those who will most likely use it. Does that make sense?


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coachkev

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Reply with quote  #8 

Bob.....Please....[nono][rofl]


 

Azzuri, positionless training creates positionless development.
This is not reinventing the wheel here you know.
Michels experimented with this in his Total Football concept in the 60s and 70s
He developed the idea from Jack Reynolds 'whirl' system

I liken this to Watercolor Painting and Oil painting.....watercolor is a one time coating so you have to get it right first time or its spoiled. Its fast, free flowing without responsibility whereas oil painting is progressive and painstaking in its application and if there's an error its okay to paint over the top of the error.

I'm all for players learning all the skills necessary to PLAY in all positions. Coaching is developing what players CAN do first and then coaching them to do what they CANNOT do.

But the GK IS a specialist player. Just as you would give more time to hone a strikers technical ability to strike the ball, you must hone a goalkeepers abilities to keep the ball OUT.

I'll say it again......ALL players are hijacked to the ability level and experience of the coach who coaches them.
Players will end up echoing the aspirations of the coach whereas the more experienced coaches will assess what their players strengths and weaknesses are and then see what playing jigsaw those players fit best.
Then you physically get them as fit as possible to be able to play at their maximum for as long as possible.

These days, I find myself instinctively looking for problems and then challenging myself to come up with the right solutions.
The hardest thing I find is NOT the players but the ego's of naive new inexperienced coaches who want the world NOW but dont want to pay the price.

coachkev

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Reply with quote  #9 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoach17
I am a GK coach by trade so I've done a lot of the 'Integrating the GK" sessions with the coaching staff at my club for when I'm not at their sessions.  Here are a few regular drills that include a GK...

1. Variation on soccer tennis type SSG (complete X passes and then pass to the other side for a point) add goals where the players get a bonus point for scoring on the GK to play it to the other side (if you only have one GK put one goal in the centre of the grid):

Integrating the GK.jpg 
1b.  Variation:  Put endzones at the back of each side...to get a put you must play a long ball to the GK for a point...GK must cleanly play the ball (with feet or hands) for the point to count.  GK then distributes to other team with an under hand bowl.

Integrating the GK 2.jpg 

2. During pre-match warm ups when the team is passing and moving freely in space, I will include the GK in the action from his goal (similar to how kev described his drill with the backs).  field players can chip the ball into the GK's hands (followed by hand distribution of some kind) or play the ball along the floor for a pass back simulation.  This helps remind the field players they can use the GK to pass to.

3. During a passing and movement exercise like the prematch warm up the GK's can intercept any pass (diving save, parry, etc).  Variation 2:  Spit to 2 teams...to get a point your Xth pass must be caught in the air by the GK(s) who are neutral.

Really any drill can incorporate the GK...rather than playing the ball with their feet/chest, etc they play it with their hands and distribute accordingly.

Thanks, that was the kind of thing I was anticipating....appreciate it c17

thecoach17

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Reply with quote  #10 
I'll dig up some more when I get a chance.
coachkev

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Reply with quote  #11 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoach17
I'll dig up some more when I get a chance.

And I'll put up some too.

MrSoccer

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Reply with quote  #12 
Keeper had separate keeper practices with a keeper coach. He was a still active player in our adult league.

When he was not doing that he practiced with us as a field player.

After every practice we broke up the team and played against each other. No keepers used a cone for a goal hit it you score. I got that from playing street soccer. You could not protect the cone on defense. You do that the ball hit the player defending the cone it's a goal.

Defender fall back and man defend. We did it practically after every practice.

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thecoach17

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Reply with quote  #13 
Here are a few other sessions that I do to incorporate my goalkeeper:

1.  communication and organization:

GK communication and organization shadow play.jpg 
Line up the team in whatever formation you use with a few random balls scattered around the field.  Coach calls out which ball they are attacking (assign a number or for younger ages put different coloured cones beside each ball).  GK is working on organizing their back line and communicating with then.  Progress by having the team just move the ball around in some kind of pattern play, while the GK organizes the defenders in front of them.  Add in extra players to progress from an 11v0 shadow play to 11v6 or whatever you have with passive defenders.  I do this A LOT with my U14 GK's/teams as that is the first year they move into the full 11v11 game where I am from, so it's overwhelming for them to see all those players cover such a big space.  I also use this so the GK can work on distribution (telling the players to shift and tuck in if going long, shift left if going short to the left, etc).

2.  Penetrating passes for the team players...shot stopping, distribution, or 1v1 for the GK's
Penetrating passes ending with shot.jpg Each team passes to their own players...each player must receive the ball, turn and pass along to the next player, then follow their pass.  The last player shoots on goal.  Can be used as a rapid fire drill for the GK, or slow it down a little and after each save the GK distributes the ball back out, either under hand bowl to the player that just shot as they run back to the start of the line (IE: in the pic the black player running along the top), or they can use a throw or volley (depending on the space you are using) to send the ball back to the start of the line again.  Can also change it up so the shooter must take on the GK 1v1 so the GK can work on those skills as well.

2. SSG's
Play a 7v7 game (or whatever # you want), where the play ALWAYS restarts from the GK...any loss of possession out the back goes to the defending teams GK...any ball out the side starts from a goalkick/pass.

3. Shooting circuit with feints for field players
Shooting curcuit with feints.png 

4.  Functional training for GK's building out through the back 4.

GK functional building from the back.jpg  Coach/server (RED) plays a ball into the GK with back 4 in a defensive formation (compact, shifted to side of field where play is, etc).  when ball is played in back 4 immediately transition into a counter attack position and the GK quickly distributes out.  you can use field players (IE: midfielders) as transitional players...LB gets pass and plays to the LMF...players treat it like a turn over (LMF is not looking to send a penetrating ball in, defenders take on defensive shape, etc).  Variation...coach plays ball into the back line who pass back to GK and the transition starts from there.  Progression:  add in opposing field players for pressure, or add in midfielders so defenders can move the ball up the field.  After you add pressure players, add a couple wingers at half so the GK can play a long ball if the short option is not on (if you have run out of players at this point use a couple pop up goals or something as a target for the GK).

5.  And interesting concept I picked up from the NSCAA convention a couple years ago was to just have your GK "watch" a quick passing session.  Keep their head still and just move their eyes to follow the ball.  eye muscles are like all other muscles and need to be worked...the more you work on your eyes moving quickly the quicker they get.  I would assume you wouldn't want to do this for an entire practice, but for one drill for 10 minutes or so might do some good.

6. shoulder check/decision making drill
shoulder check drill.jpg  Working player in the middle, 2 players on each end each have a cone in each hand.  Player A passes to middle player.  Prior to receiving the ball middle player must must shoulder check to see if there is pressure or an opportunity...player B flashes a cone to signal pressure or an opportunity.  In the example, RED means opportunity to turn and pass to B, yellow would be there is pressure so you must pass back to A.  To make it applicable for the GK's simulate a pass back where the GK only makes a half head turn to the other side of the field rather than behind them to find the cone.  Add variations...receive with inside of opposite foot, receive a cross the body with opposite foot, add a fake (IE: if YELLOW is shown to pass back to A, open up to B, then use a pull turn or some kind of change of direction to turn back to play to A).

7. when working on 1v1 skills, replace the cone/defender with a GK so they can work on 1v1 skills during your drill.

8. Diagonal penetrating through balls.

integrating the GK penetrating long balls.jpg 

When working on penetrating long balls into space from the midfield (or whoever), place a GK in that space and have the midfielders try to hit the GK in the hands (working on intercepting through balls/crosses in the air).  When GK receives it he plays the ball back out (working on various distributions) to attack the other side.


9. Keeper Wars

GK wars.jpg  If you have 2 keepers and a movable goal or 2, put them up against each other in a game of keeper wars.  They will battle it out for hours if you let them (although it's a VERY exhausting game).  This game is constant end to end action.  GK1 starts with the ball in his hands and attempts a goal on GK2.  If the save is made, GK2 immediately counters as quick as possible.  If it's a goal, GK2 must grab the ball from the goal and immediately attack.  The basic rules are:  you must stay in your own half and with in the grid.  You can use any form of distribution (volley, goalkick, overhand throw, etc).  Progression:  If you have some extra field players around add 1 neutral player for the attacking GK to pass to (either player can finish), or add 2 players...one attacker for each team (teammate must stay in the opposing teams half at all times, attacking player can only attack...no defending or intercepting passes, however the GK can intercept a pass).

10. GK Golf:  typically only good if you are outside.  Pick a target (a tree, a bench, a goal post, the coaches arse, whatever).  The goal is to use only one punt, one goalkick and one over hand throw to hit the target (like a par 3 golf hole).  After you've used those 3 you can only pass/chip from the ground or underhand bowl with proper technique.  Whoever gets the lowest score after a few rounds wins.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

When in absolute doubt and no clue what to do with them, train then with the strikers...if they understand what the strikers are learning they will be able to read the play coming at them and start to pick up on tip off about what they are doing as the play builds.  Jorge Campos played regularly as a goalkeeper and some years striker at the club level scoring 30+ goals as a field player in his career and was was Mexico's starting GK in the '94 and '98 World Cup with 130 caps at the end of his career.  He often attributed his versatility to the fact that when he played in goal he knew what the striker was thinking before he did it and when he played as a striker he knew what the GK was thinking on the other end.

It should also be noted that statistically speaking they've done studies and 65ish% of the time the GK's use their feet when interacting with the ball so it's important to work on their foot skills as a field player as well.  If they are a full time GK, cut them out of the sessions teaching the Cruyff turns and scissors, etc, but regular dribbling, passing, etc, they need just as much as GK specific skills.

coachkev

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Reply with quote  #14 

Thats a comprehensive list of relevant activities there c17 [thumb]

One I like to run gets players to line up in their normal positions with the GK performing 1-2's with ALL in the fastest time out of three 'rounds'

                                        X10                                        X9

 
            X8                                     X7                  X6                                X5

      X3                                                                                                              X1

                                     X4                                          X2
             

                                                          GKo

After the three rounds, I then give the GK, X4 and X9 a ball and ALL must pass to the next X up (GK to X1, X1 TO X2, while X4 plays to X5, and X9 to X10 with X10 plying high to the GK.

The challenge now is to make sure no X is has no more than one ball to play.

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