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craigl

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Reply with quote  #21 

JBrowntown7,

I'd do some 1v1 and 2v1 (maybe 3v2).  With 1v1 they have to beat the player and defend as there is no where to hide.  With 2v1 they have the dribble or the pass decision (and support) so they don't always dribble as the only option.  I didn't see you mentioning these.  I like to do them and then add goals so they finish on goal.  You can do 1v1 with out keepers or with keepers and have them swap after goals are scored.  You can do 1v1 face to face, side to side, or back to so they face different scenarios.  You can work lots of transitioning so they immediately win the ball back after they lose it.

You can do a game we call "combat" where there are two lines single file.  You call 1 and 1 and toss the ball.  The first player in each line battle to win the ball and pass it to you.  You can move around later so they have to find you.  This provides transition, dribbling, passing, and requires vision.   You can do it 2v1, or 2v2 as well.  You don't need to do it much, but a couple times and it helps them develop vision and shielding.

You can do a game we call "shoot out" where players are in pairs with a ball between them and both feet on the ground.  You call go and they try to do a pull back on the ball.  First player to get the ball wins.   They progress to having the ball after 5 seconds.  Then progress to having the ball 15-30 seconds later.  Repeat.  It gets some quickness and competition to win the ball.

Also, I like to work on shooting lots.   It never hurts to have your players capable of finishing better than the other players.  They will tend to get noticed.  The shooting work often carries over to better passing.

If they are timid, work on headers.   Players won't be aggressive if they are scared of the ball.  By learning headers they are not afraid of the ball and they will have more confidence in the game.   Also, I have them do ball wrestling.  Each player grips the same soccer ball with their hands and on "go" command they both try to wrestle the ball out of the other players hands to be the last person holding the ball.   It is a competitive activity that requires them to fight to hold possession.

Unfortunately, I think many coaches don't teach off ball movement, visions, and game intelligence so if your players mix with players that don't understand it limits them as they need players they can combine with.  You may want to prepare them by helping them become aware that some players understand and some players do not.

Sounds like they are luck to have a good coach.

Good luck!
craigl

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Posts: 932
Reply with quote  #22 
One issue is if you don't have a great dribbler then your players don't get to practice against good dribblers in practice.  So, in the game, you can coach them to stay between the ball and the goal.   Keep their eye on the ball.  Timing the tackle.   Try to scrimage teams with good dribbling so they can see it.  When it is new to them they get beat, but they can adapt quickly.

Coerver ball feel, turns, and 1v1 stuff can improve their ability on ball.  
craigl

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Posts: 932
Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBrowntown7


Our season started 2 weeks after I got my D license, so I started out trying to end with a short scrimmage. Absolute Chaos. They got nothing out of it so I changed it to only scrimmaging with a few limitations once every 3 weeks. It was more effective. 

 


Sometimes, you let them scrimage and observe.  It is ok if it is poor soccer.  You see where they are at.   did practice carry over to the game?

With raw new teams, I sometimes shorten scrimage time early in the season to get the skill level up with limited time, but later in the season I give them more scrimage time once they have some of the skills.   Players learn lots just playing and observing.   Scrimage an older team.   Talk about what the other team did and how team could be better to add it to their game.

I try to teach them to play pick up.  You want to have an atmosphere where they play on their own if you are late rather than they wait for you to organize the drills.   Hopefully, they play on their own because you have limited training time.   Also, I show them juggling and soccer tennis.


MisterLogic

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Posts: 95
Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBrowntown7



They are better in traffic. 

For example my players can beat just about any defender 1v1 in open field. However theirs can dribble in traffic through three different players and come out with the ball.







To me, this doesn't jive with your statement that your players are better technically.

I haven't seen you coach, and I haven't seen your players, but maybe you are seeing things as wish, rather than as they are. 
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