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TT

Registered: 10/27/05
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #1 

I want to switch to a zonal marking system during a corner kick.  Exactly where do you position your players in a zonal system?

Doublerunner

Registered: 03/24/04
Posts: 2,980
Reply with quote  #2 

In the zone in front of my goal

TheGiss

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Registered: 09/28/05
Posts: 5,494
Reply with quote  #3 

It seems to me that Doublerunner is dead on, but, you need to be careful with a zonal defense on corners until you see where the runs are coming frrom.

Many teams flood the center; my team has two "big kick" girls *HS, granted, so we start everybody in front but have several girls running back side and they often shake loose. Clearly, you need to adjust depending on what i sgoing on. Of course, the idea is that as soon as we play three or four back post corners and they redeploy defenders there, we play a medium ball to a supporting outside defender who has a strike, usually unmarked. Now if we can just get enough corners to actually make it happen....


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craigl

Registered: 02/12/06
Posts: 847
Reply with quote  #4 
I'm not much of an expert on zonal or man-man marking. I just take what I want my attacking players to do on corner and reverse the responsibilities.

For corners, I think about five areas.

a) near post area: defenders are to prevent ball to getting to front of the goal if at all possible. If you can't get to the ball prevent the attacker from getting to it (within the scope of the rules). Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

b) middle area ; clear the ball high far and wide. If you can't clear it prevent the forward from getting to it (within the scope of the rules). Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

c) far post area : clear the ball away from the goal. If you can't clear it prevent the forward from getting to it (within the scope of the rules). Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

d) outside near edge of the box: ready to address cleared balls and prevent shots. Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

e) keeper. This is a whole post in and of itself... catch or clear, communication, organization, shot stopping, ... communicate to player standing on the goal's near post and the goal's far post... when to hold and when to move out for offside trap. Read inswinger or outswinger...


AFB

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Registered: 02/16/04
Posts: 6,327
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TT

I want to switch to a zonal marking system during a corner kick.  Exactly where do you position your players in a zonal system?

 

Why?


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KeiththeKoach

Registered: 03/31/04
Posts: 2,172
Reply with quote  #6 

You should defend corner kicks with a mix of zonal and man marking.  Runners have a distinct advantage and must be marked.  The usual set up for zonal 'markers' is three players, one opposite the posts and one opposite the goal centre and all three on the 6 yard line.  They are instructed to attack any ball in the space in front of them. 

 

Total man marking at corners leaves a team vulnerable since the markers are concentrating on the opponent as much as the flight of the ball.  The three zonal markers focus solely on ball flight and head the ball upwards and in the direction they are facing.  Mind you, this is my opinion and the system I have found to be most successful over a number of years.

 

 

first_touch

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Registered: 11/15/05
Posts: 2,740
Reply with quote  #7 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeiththeKoach

You should defend corner kicks with a mix of zonal and man marking.  Runners have a distinct advantage and must be marked.  The usual set up for zonal 'markers' is three players, one opposite the posts and one opposite the goal centre and all three on the 6 yard line.  They are instructed to attack any ball in the space in front of them. 

 

Total man marking at corners leaves a team vulnerable since the markers are concentrating on the opponent as much as the flight of the ball.  The three zonal markers focus solely on ball flight and head the ball upwards and in the direction they are facing.  Mind you, this is my opinion and the system I have found to be most successful over a number of years.

 

 

would the 3 zonal markings also want a player near post (YES?) and far post (maybe?) to take 5 players out of man marking?


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KeiththeKoach

Registered: 03/31/04
Posts: 2,172
Reply with quote  #8 

Many do defend corners with a player inside each post but some keepers prefer not to have the near post defender.  Even if both posts are covered there are still 5 players available for man marking.

 

 

Allez_Arsenal

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Registered: 05/05/04
Posts: 1,100
Reply with quote  #9 

I always wondered if everyone on your team can line up on the goal line....some can sit on each other's shoulders......forming some sort of wall in the goal...

 

Mabey I will try that this weekend.....

 

AA


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lightningcoach

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Registered: 04/17/06
Posts: 54
Reply with quote  #10 

I think it is best to do zone and man marking. For zone I generally get the near and far post, unless they have a second player by the corner then I send my near post player to help the other player that is 10yds by the kicker. If the team is good at lofting the ball then I take my 10yd player and put then in the red zone, where there is another player. Everyone else marks

Mchill

Registered: 02/21/05
Posts: 252
Reply with quote  #11 

i have always allowed my best two players in the air to play zone while the rest mark.  My two players playing zone take the front or far post. they try to guess where the ball is going based on the runs being made.  their instructions are to go and get the ball if it is in their zone or they can get there.  my man markers do their best to body-up, disrupt runs, and stay with their mark.

thsi system has served us well even though we are almost always smaller than our opponents.

gregm

Registered: 02/22/04
Posts: 1,464
Reply with quote  #12 

Mchill, shouldn't the players taking the near and far posts stay put until the ball is cleared?  That's how most teams play it.

I also like a mix of zone and man marking and the two zone players are usually placed about 8 yards from the goal. Everyone else is making an opponent.

JimN

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 3,942
Reply with quote  #13 
My first inclination is to ask why you want to change. I have used man, zone, and a mix, but all for different reasons. Anyway, here is the zone that I mostly use:


Code:

__________
.............................| |.............................
x G x x(ten yards from ball)
x(edge of six)
x x x

x x


with one man left out high, near center circle.

If needed, I bring the one left high back into the box to either man mark or clog things up more.




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benji

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Registered: 03/01/04
Posts: 2,862
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeiththeKoach

Many do defend corners with a player inside each post but some keepers prefer not to have the near post defender. Even if both posts are covered there are still 5 players available for man marking.



Keith, are you sure you meant "some keepers prefer not to have the near post defender"? I have yet to see a keeper forego the near post defender, while many will do away with a far post defender (I'm one of them). The near post defender is key to cutting out driven near-post balls, which allows the keeper to take up a starting position further back in the net in a better area for the majority of crosses.

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MikeS

Registered: 03/20/04
Posts: 3,940
Reply with quote  #15 

Jimn,

 

My kid's coach tells the player defending at the ball / corner to always encroach and make them ask for ten yards. Do it grudgingly when the ref makes you.

 


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JimN

Registered: 03/04/04
Posts: 3,942
Reply with quote  #16 
yeah, Mike, I should have written 8 yards from the ball, because that is what we shoot for.  I did ten because that is the rule, but realistically we always sneak a little in, then move back as necessary.

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KeiththeKoach

Registered: 03/31/04
Posts: 2,172
Reply with quote  #17 

Benji. Correction.  FAR post.  My bad. Cheers.

 

(Why is the red faced smiley blue?)

 

 

coachkev

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Registered: 01/26/04
Posts: 13,454
Reply with quote  #18 

Quote:
Originally Posted by craigl
I'm not much of an expert on zonal or man-man marking. I just take what I want my attacking players to do on corner and reverse the responsibilities.

For corners, I think about five areas.

a) near post area: defenders are to prevent ball to getting to front of the goal if at all possible. If you can't get to the ball prevent the attacker from getting to it (within the scope of the rules). Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

b) middle area ; clear the ball high far and wide. If you can't clear it prevent the forward from getting to it (within the scope of the rules). Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

c) far post area : clear the ball away from the goal. If you can't clear it prevent the forward from getting to it (within the scope of the rules). Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

d) outside near edge of the box: ready to address cleared balls and prevent shots. Prevent the shot and then prevent attempts to keep the ball in front of the goal.

e) keeper. This is a whole post in and of itself... catch or clear, communication, organization, shot stopping, ... communicate to player standing on the goal's near post and the goal's far post... when to hold and when to move out for offside trap. Read inswinger or outswinger...


"I just take what I want my attacking players to do on corner and reverse the responsibilities."

 

This is a way of coaching that is catching on.

When I coach Defensive tactics I am asking players to think more and more about what the Attacking team want to do and THEN prevent it.

If I coach Attacking tactics, then I ask them to think about what the Defenders are trying NOT to let them do and/or what defenders HATE them to do and to repsond accordingly.

 

For the topic though all that has been discussed would be meaningless if a team PREVENTED conceding corners in the first place!


 

TT

Registered: 10/27/05
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #19 

Thanks Jim,  your formation is what I first put in.  However, I do have a player at the top of the D and one with the goalie because many teams plant a player in front of him.

 

The reason for my change to a zonal defense against a corner kick is because I have adopted a zonal aproach with my team during the course of a game and I just want to remain consistant.

mzbrand

Registered: 01/08/05
Posts: 1,712
Reply with quote  #20 
Quote:
Originally Posted by benji
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeiththeKoach

Many do defend corners with a player inside each post but some keepers prefer not to have the near post defender. Even if both posts are covered there are still 5 players available for man marking.



Keith, are you sure you meant "some keepers prefer not to have the near post defender"? I have yet to see a keeper forego the near post defender, while many will do away with a far post defender (I'm one of them). The near post defender is key to cutting out driven near-post balls, which allows the keeper to take up a starting position further back in the net in a better area for the majority of crosses.

Interestingly, I recently ran into one (and maybe two?) keepers who were reluctant to put a player on the near post.  The one I remember first tried to get the defender to play a couple of feet from the post, but eventually asked for no defender on the post at all.  His reasoning was that he wanted to see the ball.  (I never quite understood this, though).

 

This was new to me, but now I often ask what the keeper wants if I haven't played with him before.

 

Anyone ever see this or was this just a a one-of-a kind keeper?

 

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