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Lucky614

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Reply with quote  #1 
Has anyone every taken the time to improve their own demonstration in order to help players build a better picture, when teaching basic technical skills. Passing, recieveing and even say the 5 most comply use skill moves in the game. If you did not play at the top level of the game how do you narrow the gap in order to still produce high quality players. Or do you think that it is not importent to improve your demonstration skills?
MrSoccer

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Reply with quote  #2 
You have to be able to do it to teach it so practice your skills when your not with them. If not hire a trainer.

You lose credibility if the players see you can't do the skills your trying to teach them. They give you that look you get if you mess up a skill.

it's worse when your coaching older guys.

That is why it's good to be a current player or if you have a reputation as a former player.

A lot of older coaches here in the US like to present the persona of being a father figure to older players.

It is ok to do if they are young new players for the parents and the player.

But, I never liked that when coaching older players.

better to treat older players like men always be honest with them. You want there respect

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benji

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Reply with quote  #3 
Remember, you only have to demonstrate at half to three-quarter speed, without pressure.  The players are the ones who have to do it at game speed with a defender all over them. [smile]

And whenever I screw up, I explain that I can't do the skill and talk--explain it--at the same time. Then I get a do-over as well. [biggrin]

As Mr. Soccer says, being able to demo--to a point--earns you respect and credibility with the players (especially teenage boys). You don't have to be world class, and you don't have to necessarily do it at game pace under pressure, but it can help.

For younger players, proper technique also gives them a model, if you don't already have a player on the team who you can use to model it for you.

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Goal150

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Reply with quote  #4 
when I mess up I blame my demo partner for giving me the ball too hard/too soft/to wrong foot/wrong side—[biggrin]
coachkev

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Reply with quote  #5 

Does a driving instructor ACTUALLY drive the car when they are teaching pupils to learn to drive??? of course not.
If a coach wants players to do a certain skill and they can't demo it then DON'T do the skill.
And what are the skills that a coach CAN'T demo????
All coaches should be able to...
CONTROL THE BALL (both feet)
PASS THE BALL (both feet)
RUN WITH THE BALL (both feet)
CROSS THE BALL (both feet)
SHOOT (both feet)
Variations of the above should be demonstrated by nominated players and can be a great incentive for the coach to 'reward' players for their inventiveness and practice.

As I am not as young as I once was (no wise cracks please), I rely more on my 'verbal' demonstrational skills where I ask players to try something and use simple language terms that players understand so they 'get it' right away.

Remember the 3C's - Challenge >> Competition >> Consistency.
Using this 3 way sequence, any demo will be enhanced by players wanting to get it right.

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