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newsocdad

Registered: 02/21/05
Posts: 1,418
Reply with quote  #1 

 

Giss' post about Donkeyhokey bringing in a nutritionist to speak reminded me that I wanted to raise a question here about pre-game snack/meals in the setting of high school away games.

 

Our specific situation is this:  

 

School starts at 7:25 a.m.  Being teenage girls most of them will not have eaten much, if anything, for breakfast.  Lunch is usually around 11:00 to 12:00 depending on the kid's schedule.  School is over at 2:30.  For away games the team bus will usually leave the building sometime between 3:00 to 3:15.  The Varsity and JV teams ride the bus together to the host school.  The JV game will  start at 5:00 and the Varsity game will follow around 7:00.  So, the JV starts their warm up shortly after they arrive at the host school. 

 

1.  What would you suggest for a pre-game snack for the JV players?  

 

         Post game is not really an issue as the JV Players typically leave following their game unless it is a big match or against a rival.  Technically there is no eating or drinking allowed on the bus, but I think we can bend that rule a little if the food/drink is not messy,  i.e. no popcorn.

 

2.  What would you suggest for the Varsity players?  They will

obviously have more time as they must sit through the JV game.  Typically they eat some sort of self-supplied snack and do homework along with keeping an eye on the JV game.

 

I am thinking we need something that can be individually bagged and handed out.  Cost, is always a consideration, but not likely to be a key factor as long as we can stay semi-reasonable with the ingrediants.  Caviar out.  Chicken sandwich or equivalent, probably okay.  

 

 

 

    

 

TheGiss

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Registered: 09/28/05
Posts: 5,487
Reply with quote  #2 
1. THEY MUST EAT BREAKFAST- 5-600 CALORIES (Pardon me for yelling)
2. Lunch when they are scheduled- some carbs and some lean protein
3. A second lunch before the get on the bus- turkey, chicken or tuna, for instance (sandwich okay), with an apple and a banana. They have 45 minutes to eat and dress.

Most important, water throughout the day.


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MJ_SoccerRef

Registered: 05/13/11
Posts: 56
Reply with quote  #3 
Peanut butter & banana sandwiches.  Bananas are a great source of potassium (prevent cramping), little bit of protien in the PB, and some simple starch in the bread.  Easily digested.  Fruit salad, using citrus fruit (orange, pineapple, etc.) also high in simple sugars & vitamin C.  Both H2O and something with electrolytes in it. 

I agree with Giss....breakfast on game day a must, eat lighter after that.

The U14s I coached that final spring season pigged out @ Burger King 3 hours before our championship game.....I think about half my hair-loss came that afternoon.  Played in 90+ temps.....won it all anyway.  Teenage boys......YOI!
aceworld

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Registered: 01/28/05
Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #4 
I coach a high school girls soccer team and we have a group of mothers that rotate getting snack bags ready for each away game, the booster club reimburses the parent.  A different family does it for each game and the exact contents of the bag for each game differs slightly, but for the most part it is a sandwich of some sort (ham, turkey, or PB and J) along with a fruit and maybe a light snack ie granola bar or powerbar.  It seems to work out really well.  We also feed the girls after the varsity game, it could be pizza or 2 dollar menu items.  

I have also tried this is a couple of times this year and the girls seem to like it.  I have the JV eat their snack bag as we are travelling to their game and we drop off the JV team to warm up.  I then take the varsity team to Subway or somewhere else and we either eat there or take it to go.  The JV girls get their subs after the game and the varisty can eat thier snack bag after the their game.  Either way I make sure my girls eat at least twice while they are in my care on game day. 

Home games the booster club also provides food for both teams. 

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paulee

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Registered: 11/29/04
Posts: 7,576
Reply with quote  #5 

Ace, you better double check UIL, if the girls are paying for their own stuff, that's fine, but no-one can provide anything for them unless they provide it to every single student in the school.


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gregm

Registered: 02/22/04
Posts: 1,464
Reply with quote  #6 
I volunteered for a booster organization selling food at basketball games a few times this season. I was just shocked how many basketball players (home and away players) had pizza, hotdogs, and soda before their games. This was JV and varsity players.
mbiyenm

Registered: 03/21/04
Posts: 3,486
Reply with quote  #7 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ_SoccerRef
The U14s I coached that final spring season pigged out @ Burger King 3 hours before our championship game.....I think about half my hair-loss came that afternoon.  Played in 90+ temps.....won it all anyway.  Teenage boys......YOI!

I see no problem.  3 hours is plenty of time to digest.   Did that all my life and even now.  Always hated being hungry at the end of games.   Some people might have problem digesting grease.  As long as the caloric balance is maintained and they get the proper nutrition...  

aceworld

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Registered: 01/28/05
Posts: 117
Reply with quote  #8 
Last year yes. This year UIL got out of all the food handling mess. It was too much of a headache for them. The $1 rule doesn't exist anymore.
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“A good coach is able to take a player where they have never been before and will not get to on their own.” Bill Beswick
TheGiss

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Registered: 09/28/05
Posts: 5,487
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ_SoccerRef
Peanut butter & banana sandwiches.  Bananas are a great source of potassium (prevent cramping), little bit of protien in the PB, and some simple starch in the bread.  Easily digested.  Fruit salad, using citrus fruit (orange, pineapple, etc.) also high in simple sugars & vitamin C.  Both H2O and something with electrolytes in it. 

I agree with Giss....breakfast on game day a must, eat lighter after that.

The U14s I coached that final spring season pigged out @ Burger King 3 hours before our championship game.....I think about half my hair-loss came that afternoon.  Played in 90+ temps.....won it all anyway.  Teenage boys......YOI!


Years ago, I had two guys who would always get to the indoor facility early so they could get nachos with cheese, jalapenos and chili. Both ended up playing pointy ball on the O-line. Not a huge surprise.

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Be Impeccable with your Word -- Don’t Take Anything Personally -- Don’t Make Assumptions -- Always Do Your Best:
MJ_SoccerRef

Registered: 05/13/11
Posts: 56
Reply with quote  #10 

Another thought....how about a snack AFTER the game?  We had a PT/AT @ one of our ref meetings a year or so ago,and she reccommended, among other things, a post-game snack high in protein, so the body would not attempt to break down muscle mass when replenishing what was just burnt off.  Makes sense to me.   In season, when I have a bit of a drive to get home, I'll grab a fast food fish or chicken sandwich for the ride home.

TheGiss

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Registered: 09/28/05
Posts: 5,487
Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ_SoccerRef

Another thought....how about a snack AFTER the game?  We had a PT/AT @ one of our ref meetings a year or so ago,and she reccommended, among other things, a post-game snack high in protein, so the body would attempt to break down muscle mass when replenishing what was just burnt off.  Makes sense to me.   In season, when I have a bit of a drive to get home, I'll grab a fast food fish or chicken sandwich for the ride home.



Absolutely- within 30 minutes after is when your body is most receptive. Benji published some good stuff on this years ago- I used it in my team policies, with a few changes- will see if I can find it.

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TheGiss

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Registered: 09/28/05
Posts: 5,487
Reply with quote  #12 

 Found it- sort of long:

Prior to the Competition

The most critical time for proper nutrition and hydration while preparing for a game is not the day of the event, but the 24 to 48 hours before. While a balanced diet is always important, the fraction of complex carbohydrates they eat should be higher than usual, to build up supplies of glycogen (the main muscle fuel). Foods like potatoes, pasta, bread, rice, cereals, fresh or dried fruits, and vegetables are good choices.

Hydration during this period is especially important, particularly during hot weather. The body takes time to absorb water; you simply can't start drinking right before a game and expect to be properly hydrated. A player must drink plenty of water regularly the day or two before the match; I have heard this called "pre-hydrating". Because the body can only soak up the water so fast, drinking small amounts of water more often is much more effective. Drinking large amounts of water at once just means a quicker trip to the rest room; much of the water simply passes through.

Properly "pre-hydrated" and glycogen-loaded players will feel better, have more energy and have increased stamina out on the field!

Day of the Game

Food eaten the day of the game can influence an athlete’s performance. Food high in fat takes longer to digest and leave the stomach, and can slow a player down by diverting blood from the muscles to the digestive system. Some protein is important (recent studies have shown improvement in the absorption of energy for athletes given a 4:1 carb/protein ratio), but try to avoid eggs, sausage, fried food, greasy burgers with lots of sauce, dairy products -- in short, most fast food places are not great for pre-game (or post-game) meals. Ideally, eat the pre-game meal 3-4 hours before the match begins. So for afternoon games, lunch is the critical meal. For night games, try to get an early dinner.

Players should continue to hydrate with small amounts of water regularly right up until about an hour before arriving at the game (2 hours before game time). By 2 hours before kickoff, the player should be properly hydrated; stop drinking as much then to allow time for the bladder to empty. Players should then drink 10-12 ounces of water during warm-ups.

During the Game

Athletes can lose significant amounts of water when exercising, especially in hot weather. This needs to be replenished. As before, small, regular drinks are the way to go, so occasional sips during warm-ups and whenever possible during the game are recommended. Sports drinks are a good choice, since they can replace some expended carbohydrates and electrolytes that are lost due to sweat. However, the Gatorade and other sports drinks sold today have much more sugar in them than the original formulations, to make them more palatable as an "everyday" drink. For drinking during the game, I recommend sports drinks be mixed or diluted to about 3/4 to 1/2 their regular strength. Plain water the best choice during the game -- this is up to the player's preference.

Solid food can cause digestive problems or divert the body's energy from the muscles, so snacks mid-game should be eaten sparingly.

After the Game

Muscles are most receptive to carbohydrate replacement in the first two hours after exhaustive exercise, especially in the first 30 minutes or so. It's important that the players replenish their energy stores during this time. Fat and high protein will slow the ability of the body to absorb carbohydrates. Players will also have lost a lot of water and that will need to be replenished, so plenty of drinking in the hours just after a game is recommended.

This is when sports drinks are a good choice Other good post-game snacks are clear candies (e.g. gummy worms, Skittles), fruit snacks (e.g. raisins or roll-ups), granola or energy bars, cookies, pretzels. Avoid caffeinated beverages, dairy products, and high-fat foods like chips or donuts.

Players should also eat a balanced meal with plenty of carbs within about two hours of the end of the game, and continue to drink plenty of water to rehydrate. After two hours without eating after exercise, the body will only be able to achieve 50% recovery! Plan ahead. Proper nutrition will help the player recover faster, whether for the next game or practice, or for school the next day.

Game-Day Snack Guidelines

Players should have plenty of water or (preferably diluted) sports drink for the duration of warm-up and game.

Limit food during game, but a light snack – piece of fruit or granola bar, is acceptable.

Post-game snacks should include a drink and some high-carb, low-fat food.

Drink: Sports drink (best), fruit juice or non-caffeinated soda (okay). Avoid dairy products or caffeinated beverages. Dilute sports drinks 25-50% if possible.

Food: Granola or energy bars, pretzels, raisins or fruit snacks (roll-ups), "clear" candies (gummy bears, Skittles), cookies, lower-sugar breakfast cereal like shredded wheat or raisin bran. Avoid high-fat foods (chips, donuts).


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Be Impeccable with your Word -- Don’t Take Anything Personally -- Don’t Make Assumptions -- Always Do Your Best:
paulee

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Registered: 11/29/04
Posts: 7,576
Reply with quote  #13 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aceworld
Last year yes. This year UIL got out of all the food handling mess. It was too much of a headache for them. The $1 rule doesn't exist anymore.

That's good to know, I guess I should pay better attention.

__________________
"When you start, you may have to move tons of dirt to find a gold nugget .... but when you start mining for gold, you overlook the dirt."
-Andrew Carnegie
newsocdad

Registered: 02/21/05
Posts: 1,418
Reply with quote  #14 

Thanks for the comments.  I will compile them (and any others) and forward to the team trainer.  The Boosters are meeting this week so we will try and get things organized.

BillyGates

Registered: 12/31/10
Posts: 186
Reply with quote  #15 
Here's some good FIFA eating guides and a 'booklet' too: 

http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/footballdevelopment/medical/playershealth/food/index.html

http://www.fifa.com/mm/document/footballdevelopment/medical/51/55/15/nutritionbooklet%5fneue2010.pdf

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